How One Speciality Bike Brand Tailors Email Automations to Their Unique Business

If you’re an avid biker, you’ve probably heard of a power meter before. And you probably know that the best place to get one is from Power Meter City

But if you’re like me, you’re a little more familiar with the workings of the stationary bikes found in spin class, which is why I asked Josh Matthews, founder and owner of Power Meter City, a little bit more about what exactly a power meter is when we spoke recently. 

“A power meter is a part that you put on your bicycle. It has a battery and an electronic sensor in it. It sends your pedaling power, which is measured in watts, to a little bicycle computer that’s mounted on your handlebars in real-time and tells you how hard you’re pedaling. Knowing that data is really helpful if you’re trying to become a faster cyclist,” said Josh. 

But while pedaling power data is essential to elite cyclists, it’s customer data that’s been most influential in Josh’s marketing. 

After patiently explaining power meters to me, Josh also provided insight into creating a strategy that fits his unique business, including what email automations have been most effective in helping him increase his customer base. He shared the following:

1 | Up-sells

Many of the products Josh sells through Power Meter City work well with each other or should be bought together for maximum effectiveness, but customers don’t always buy both products they need right away. 

That’s why he depends on up-sell automations to encourage customers to buy complementary products if they only purchase one item.

“If this customer buys Product A, in 60 days they automatically receive a message saying, ‘I hope you’re enjoying your product. What about Product B?’” said Josh.

“It just takes 30 minutes to set up and then you’re done. And it just sits there and works forever, so up-sell automations are very helpful,” he said.

While many brands sell complementary products, implementing up-sell automations like Josh’s can help introduce customers to products they didn’t even know they needed to increase average order value (AOV)—especially if your products are not frequently replaced, like power meters, which most consumers won’t have to replace for years.

Top takeaway: Make product recommendations to customers that complement the items they’ve already bought from your brand.

"It just takes 30 minutes to set up and then you're done. And it just sits there and works forever."

Josh Matthews, founder and owner, Power Meter City

2 | Product feedback

Reviews make a huge difference when it comes to the customer experience, while having a lack of positive reviews or reviews, in general, can make consumers wary of buying from your brand. 

“Getting people to come back to the site and leave reviews is historically a difficult thing for companies to do. But that feedback is valuable. People like to see reviews before they buy,” said Josh.

In order to get product feedback, he set up a post-purchase automation that sends out an email to customers 15 days after they bought from Power Meter City asking them to leave a review. 

“The post-purchase product review request might not drive sales because the customer is coming back to leave a review, not spend money. But indirectly having those reviews helps us sell products to other people, so it’s incredibly valuable. And those automations have performed very well in terms of getting people to come back and write a review.”

For this reason, a post-purchase strategy has been essential for Josh when it comes to building consumer trust in Power Meter City and making it one of the most reputable brands in the market.

Top takeaway: Consider asking customers for product reviews as part of your post-purchase strategy.

"Getting people to come back to the site and leave reviews is historically a difficult thing for companies to do. But that feedback is valuable. People like to see reviews before they buy."

Josh Matthews, founder and owner, Power Meter City

3 | Abandoned cart

For Power Meter City’s cart abandonment automation, Josh uses the first email to offer assistance in case the shopper has any questions on the product they were considering and waits until the second email in the series to offer a discount. 

“But it gets more complicated than that,” noted Josh.

“There are certain products that we don’t want to give out coupons for. Maybe it’s a product that our margin is very low on and we can’t afford to give them one. Or, maybe there are manufacturers who we work with that prefer us not to discount their products. That’s why we break the emails apart based on what product the person was viewing,” he said.

“Automation can get infinitely complex, which is a good thing. It really allows me to tailor the right message to the right people and, in our case, not give a discount to every single person because that’s not what we want to do”

By providing abandoned cart discounts based on the product, Josh has customized his marketing strategy not only to his customers but also to his business model to ensure he’s not cutting into his profit margins or irritating suppliers who he works closely with. 

Top takeaway: Segment cart abandonment emails by product if you don’t want to give out discounts to every shopper.

"Automation can get infinitely complex, which is a good thing. It really allows me to tailor the right message to the right people and, in our case, not give a discount to every single person because that's not what we want to do."

Josh Matthews, founder and owner, Power Meter City

4 | Welcome series

Should you send one email in your welcome series or eight? Or is it somewhere in between? For Josh, the magic number is three.

The first email contains an introduction to the company and the discount code they promise during signup. If the shopper doesn’t make a purchase within two days of receiving that first email, they receive a second email, which showcases the brand’s best selling products.

If they still don’t make a purchase, they get a third email, which gives them ten reasons to shop with Power Meter City, including factors like fast shipping, competitive pricing, and top-notch customer support.

“We want to save our ammunition. If somebody purchases, why would I send them another email right away?” said Josh when I asked why he only sends the second and third emails in his welcome series to non-purchasers. 

“We try to be as selective as possible when we send emails because we want people to open it. If someone’s getting an email from you too often, they’re less likely to open it. If you’re getting an email from me once a week or once a month it’s like, ‘Oh, what’s this? I want to check it out.’ So if somebody has just made a purchase, why bother them with another email? I’ll save that next email for when we have an exciting sale and we really want them to open it,” he said.

And while this may sound like a robust email strategy, Josh insists that setting up his welcome series only took a few hours. The secret, though, is optimizing the automations over time. 

“I tinker with the welcome series based on the analytics of how each email is performing. You have the data at your disposal to adjust things the way you deem necessary, so I think the key is to just get it up and running. Then, you can make it perfect over time,” said Josh.

Top takeaway: Don’t just set it and forget it. Optimize your automations over time based on performance.

"You have the data at your disposal to adjust things the way you deem necessary, so I think the key is to just get it up and running. Then, you can make it perfect over time."

Josh Matthews, founder and owner, Power Meter City

The future for Power Meter City

While it sounds like Josh has got his marketing strategy down to a science, he acknowledges that there’s still room to build increased awareness of Power Meter City.

“We’ve been around for five years, but there’s still a lot of the cycling population who doesn’t know about us. I want to continue to get our name out there and take as much market share in the power meter market as possible,” said Josh.

But with a combination of data-driven curiosity and good, old fashioned marketing logic, Josh has clearly already made a dent.

Interested in more brand insights? Find out Vivian Kaye’s top three email automations for building customer relationships with KinkyCurlyYaki.

Back to Blog Home
Get email marketing insights delivered straight to your inbox.